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at the brookings institution hosts a discussion on improving education including the pros and cons of charter schools and how to better use technology. that's at 9 a.m. eastern. at 2 p.m. we'll be live from the pentagon or a britain with defense secretary leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey. >> first thing in our article here is getting medicare costs under control is the number one priority. and it's the most untouchable thing. but that is going to cause more trouble than any other problem we've got fiscally in the united states. getting medicare costs under control is the number one thing. >> you say we also surcharge smokers, and the o.b.'s for their medicare coverage. where did that idea come from? >> it came from us. i mean, i'm the person who put in the memo but i didn't have to fight very hard for it. also, i ran into this comp something iran and the "washington post," i call them mega fasces and i was -- [inaudible] for being insensitive in which a guess i probably am. but this is another thing where everybody knows to be true, and someone
. we talked about education. during my time as governor, we put in place the largest bond package to expand our higher ed institutions in the history of the commonwealth, and now there's significant construction at both george mason and the northern virginia community college campuses and expanded preconsidered -- prekindergarten. we landed marquee companies hilton, volkswagen of north america, northrup gum monday announced they were coming to the neighborhood. we also won accolades as the best state for business every year of my four years as governor. i'm proud of those accomplishments, i'm proud that we did them together. but i'm especially proud that we did 'em in the midst of the worst e are session -- recession since the 1930s. today we're here because we have a senate to be fixed. we've got to fix congress to end gridlock that's blocking progress to important goals. we have to grow an economy, and to do it we level the playing field for small business, we invest in infrastructure projects like rail to dulles, and we win the talent race that will enable us to outeducate, out
on this topic. educating all americans about the importance of nextgen. i know we've spent time over the years we think about of course her home state, robust aviation community in a state of wisconsin and what happens over the course of most spectacular week of the year at the oshkosh air show with the eaa. and with that said i also juxtapose my thoughts and comments regarding not just a home base of operations that come from, at new york's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion and airspace challenges that we have across places like the new york metropolitan area, philadelphia, and certainly airports here in the metropolitan washington area. all that said, mr. chairman, and certainly do ranking member costello as well, and all of my meetings throughout the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they have been writing own backyard in your own congressional districts across the country. and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. you have held hearings and conducted informational sessions and have always had an open
to educate the public so they understand how the process is posed to work -- supposed to work, and it's a big red flag when the process isn't going that way. the demand has to come from both sides, i think. >> i agree. ultimately, that's the only thing you can rely on. rules reform is incredibly important, and we put a lot of effort into it, but it's all wave bl, as hugh said. the majority can change at any time, so the thing that keeps the rules from changing constantly is public expectations about norms and what's appropriate and what isn't. that's why we didn't go crazy about the 72-hour thing. i keep putting up a blog post that has boehner promising 72 hours, but it is a big shift that says we are going to hold ourselves to that. the one reliable thing here is norms in a democracy for how things should function, and even the best rule is waiveable. i will choose clear expectations over clear rules any day, i guess, is my point. >> and i think it's worth, you know, the concern i off have is -- i often have is do the members know what they're voting to waive. and this is where there's a rul
are committed to. fda and the partnership for safe medicines need to continue to work together to educate patients, to advocate for patients, and through tough law enforcement to protect patients. the partnership for safe medicines has been a steadfast and consistent voice towards these goals. in doing so, you felt the american people be safe from products that are sold as legitimate medicines that heal, but are far more likely to be dangerous. for batch of my deep appreciation and commitment, we must continue to work together. we must build on the successes that we've already achieved together, and we must continue to put the safety and health of the public as our first and foremost priority. so thank you for your time and for all the good work that all of you do, from the various positions you hold, and your commitment to this critical public health concern. thank you so much. [applause] >> this is the first book i've written where there's an actual same storyline running through it. it's a true story of about basically 10 days of london in 1854. it's a story of an incredibly terrifying
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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